NEWS



Feb. 2017

I recently recorded a conversation between Eden Redmond, Forrest McGarvey, and myself for a publication produced by Living Room Light Exchange. Stay tuned for further details on its release date and where you can pick up a copy/hear the conversation! Eden, Forrest and I talked about Artsy's Art Genome Project. We discussed the format the database uses to categorize artwork and the company's interest to assign numerical values to 'feminist' or 'political' artworks. An artwork might be 30% feminist, for example.

It was a engaging conversation, and we had a lot of snacks as you can see in the photos below!



Nov. 2016

 

On November 6, 2016 I will be opening an exhibition titled Third Party at CTRL + SHFT Gallery, Oakland, CA

Artists: Lark Buckingham, Joanna Cheung Rhonda Holberton, Zoe McCloskey, Erica Scourti, Angela Washko

Lark Buckingham, Image still from Tattletale Heart, video, 2016  

Lark Buckingham, Image still from Tattletale Heart, video, 2016

 

Show Concept:

“The era of personalization began on December 4th, 2009” declared author Eli Pariser in his book The Filter Bubble. The date marks the introduction of the patented algorithmic filter Google established to track users online. This filter is designed to predict accurate recommendations in search results and advertisements in correspondence with user preferences that are monitored online. Many large tech companies such as Apple and Facebook now employ this personalization filter as third parties who employ codes to mine individual characteristics and subsequently calculate relevant content. Although individual traits are documented within these transactions, the results one ultimately receives are often one-size-fits all categorizations, and frequently skewed by a Western male perspective. The exhibition Third Party intends to examine the technological systems that distinguish aspects of individuality and the implications of quantifiable coded traits in everyday online environments. 

As an all female artist exhibition, each artwork serves to critique the male gaze evident within personalization filters. The selected artworks question the authority to distinguish individuals through coding, while also questioning who has access to determine economic and informational value through the use of these codes. Not only do the artists employ the use of technology and an online environment to grapple with how one is seen through code, but the artists also directly involve the physical body. In doing so, the individual is reinstated as a priority within an intangible online system that impacts information, objects, and ideas. Third Party creates a platform that questions the perpetuation of dominant ideologies through methods of algorithmic categorization.



Fall 2016

This fall I will be curating an exhibition titled Humor US, opening on September 9, 2016 at Embark Gallery in San Francisco, CA

Show concept: 

Philosopher John Morreall famously defined humor as amusement that takes pleasure in a cognitive shift. The opening of this exhibition presents a timely connection with the presidential elections, begging the questions: How might emerging artists convey religious and racial discrimination, a crippling economy, or housing costs through humor?

Artists: Douglas Angulo, Nathan Becka, Boris Scherbakov, Kaitlin Trataris, France Viana, Hui Meng Wang, Jin Zhu

     (Installation images to come...!)



May 2016

I finished my thesis! 

 

Thesis Abstract:


In the early 2000s mobile applications began organizing user data similar to archives of the early 1900s. If there is a correlation between these categorical methods, what does this mean for identity and culture that is constructed through these digital platforms? In a compression of theoretical distance between Archive theory and Media Studies, the mobile app Timehop will be analyzed within this thesis to uncover its relationship to preservation tactics associated with archives. Through my coining of the term the hybrid reflection process, my theoretical framework negotiates software development and algorithmic design to question systems of categorization that write our histories for us, and thus our beliefs, customs, and values. By analyzing these systems and their intentions, this thesis advocates for the individual to take part  in digital processes to generate information that is more personalized and representative of the self.

   

If you're interested in reading the whole thing, email me and I'll send you a pdf version. 

 


April 23, 2016 – Visual and Critical Studies Spring Symposium

 A public lecture of my thesis work titled Archives and Algorithms: Compressing Sociohistorical Distance

 

Lecture abstract:

The video performance Life in Adwords by Erica Scourti documents an eight month journey through codes, categories, and sweeping generalizations. Scourti’s work highlights how her identity online is subjected to algorithmic calculations through the adwords located in her Gmail interface. In this presentation, I will argue that the mathematical procedures used to reflect individual characteristics seen in this work are not only a product of the digital age. A similar method can be located in archives of the late 19th century. The compression of historical distance between algorithms and archives illuminates a continuum of categorical systems that define an individual and their relationship to knowledge. 



April 17, 2015

The exhibition I co-curated, Painting is Forbidden, featured on Hyperallergic:

"The show is laid out surprisingly coherently for such a mass of objects and images, and works well in the smaller back-room space of the Wattis, whose intimacy and almost-an-afterthought location supports the impression of happening upon and engaging privately with a treasure trove of one intensely creative individual’s highly personalized output. Enticingly presented, without a sense of clutter, it manages to convey the profusion and density of Wong’s greater enterprise while pointing to some of the overlap of his crossmedia explorations and sketches."          - Brian Karl
"The show is laid out surprisingly coherently for such a mass of objects and images, and works well in the smaller back-room space of the Wattis, whose intimacy and almost-an-afterthought location supports the impression of happening upon and engaging privately with a treasure trove of one intensely creative individual’s highly personalized output. Enticingly presented, without a sense of clutter, it manages to convey the profusion and density of Wong’s greater enterprise while pointing to some of the overlap of his crossmedia explorations and sketches."         
- Brian Karl


April 17, 2015

The exhibition I co-curated, Painting is Forbidden, featured on Artnet:

 
 

"Most of the Wattis show is dedicated to Wong's more peripheral material, much of it   from before he moved to New York in 1978: small early ceramics, some of angels and monsters, from his student days at Humboldt State University in Eureka, California; sketchbook pages; and a large selection of scroll-like text paintings rendering his febrile poems in dense, spidery calligraphy. The text paintings capture a very characteristic tension in Wong's whole artistic approach: his writing radiates passionate and urgent need to say something; but the stylized-to-the-point-of illegibility style puts up a barrier, making that something hard to access."

-Ben Davis  



March 13th, 2015 6:30-8:30pm

Martin Wong: Painting is Forbidden The Wattis Institute for Contemporary Art, San Francisco, CA

My thesis exhibition that I co-curated with my Curatorial Practice graduate cohort


A little bit about the exhibition...

Chinese-American artist Martin Wong (b. 1946) is best known for the paintings he produced while living in New York City in the 1970s and 1980s, where he was involved in the dynamic subcultures of the Nuyorican poets and graffiti artists. But it was in San Francisco, where he grew up, and in Eureka, California, where he studied, that Wong established himself as a prolific poet and ceramicist, a psychedelic painter, an artistic collaborator in the radical communal theater of the Angels of Light, and a self-described “Human Instamatic.”  These various influences and interests are reflected in the eclectic body of work he developed in an intense 30-year period of production, before his premature death in 1999 from AIDS-related illness. 

Painting Is Forbidden seeks to develop a fuller picture of Wong and his wild and expansive body of work by presenting over 150 works by the artist, spanning all aspects of his artistic production and encompassing writing, calligraphy, drawing, ceramics, ephemera, theatrical set design, painting, and collage. Also presented for the first time are Wong’s sketchbooks and journals, his private archive, offering an inside look into his approach to his art and his life.



April, 2017

Martin Wong: Painting is Forbidden featured on Juxatopoz:



  March 20, 2015

Kenneth Baker features Martin Wong: Painting is Forbidden on SFGATE:

"The CCA show offers the Bay Area the deepest look at Wong’s work that it has ever had. Congratulations to the college’s 2015 graduate class in curatorial practice, whose project this is." -Kenneth Baker   
"The CCA show offers the Bay Area the deepest look at Wong’s work that it has ever had. Congratulations to the college’s 2015 graduate class in curatorial practice, whose project this is."
-Kenneth Baker   



April 24th, 2015

Truth Claims Symposium

Paper presentation at UC Santa Barbara 40th Annual Art History Graduate Student Association, Department of History of Art andArchitecture



March 6 - 7, 2015

Hysterical Bodies: Disabling Normative Behavior in Contemporary Art

Paper presentation at the 8th Annual UC San Diego Visual Arts Ph.D. Symposium



Summer 2015

Mentorship Awardee with ArtTable

ArtTable invites female graduate students pursuing a career in arts administration to apply for our ArtTable’s Diversity Internship Program: A Summer Mentored Internship in the Visual Arts Professions. The program supports emerging women professionals from backgrounds generally underrepresented in the field. Through one-on-one mentoring relationships with ArtTable members, interns have the opportunity to work with an established leader in the field and gain exposure to a range of professional activities.  I was placed with ArtTable member Deirdre Ehlen at Arlington County Public Art in Arlington, VA, worked on developing concepts and planning events for ACPA's 30th anniversary to highlight 30 years of collecting public art.

ArtTable invites female graduate students pursuing a career in arts administration to apply for our ArtTable’s Diversity Internship Program: A Summer Mentored Internship in the Visual Arts Professions.


The program supports emerging women professionals from backgrounds generally underrepresented in the field. Through one-on-one mentoring relationships with ArtTable members, interns have the opportunity to work with an established leader in the field and gain exposure to a range of professional activities. 

I was placed with ArtTable member Deirdre Ehlen at Arlington County Public Art in Arlington, VA, worked on developing concepts and planning events for ACPA's 30th anniversary to highlight 30 years of collecting public art.